EVE KOSOFSKY SEDGWICK

ARCHIVE WRITING/ARTICLES

ARTICLES

RESPONSE TO C. JACOB HALE (1997)

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Response to C. Jacob Hale's "Leatherdyke Boys and Their Daddies - How to Have Sex Without Women or Men," published in the same special issue of Social Text. Sedgwick writes that Hale's paper begins "the project of articulating subjectivities that purposefully move across the boundaries of gender."

AGAINST EPISTEMOLOGY (1994)

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PEDAGOGY IN THE CONTEXT OF AN ANTIHOMOPHOBIC PROJECT (1989)

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BREAST CANCER: Issues and Resources (1995)

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In this review of an art exhibition about breast cancer, Sedgwick critiques the premise that “artists - all presumed healthy - create works of art that would, somehow, give a ‘voice’ to…women - all presumed voiceless - struggling with the disease.” She also objects to the lack of representation of lesbians in both the exhibition and in cancer research.

CONFUSION OF TONGUES: Louisa Van Velsor Whitman and Walt Whitman (1996)

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This piece takes the form of a dialogue between Sedgwick and Moon in which they counter “typecasting Whitman as the pathetic fag son of a mean and withholding father and a possessive and demanding mother,” using letters between mother and son and the theories of psychoanalyst Sandor Ferenczi.

EULOGY (2002)

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This is a remembrance of writer and theorist Lynda Myoun Hart. Sedgwick describes her as having “a kind of relishing interest and almost X-ray analysis of cultural structures emerged from the unceasing, buoyant, and indeed seemingly joyful work of her thinking and writing.”

GENDER CRITICISM (1993)

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GOSH, BOY GEORGE, YOU MUST BE AWFULLY SECURE IN YOUR MASCULINITY (1996)

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Sedgwick argues that masculinity and femininity are “orthogonal to each other” so that “instead of being at opposite poles of the same axis, they are…independently variable.” Hence masculinity sometimes has nothing to do with men, and an inquiry into “masculinity” could include not only men who are “straight, gay, and bisexual” but also men who are female.

INSIDE HENRY JAMES: Toward A Lexicon for the Art of the Novel (1995)

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MELANIE KLEIN AND THE DIFFERENCE AFFECT MAKES (2007)

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PANDAS IN TREES (1996)

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QUEERS IN (SINGLE FAMILY) SPACE (1994)

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In this dialogue between Moon and Sedgwick they describe their childhood homes and the house they share, along with a cat, in Durham, North Carolina. The house also accommodates their respective partners, “when they can spend time there,” as they live “out-of-town.”

REVIEW OF SANDRA GILBERT AND SUSAN GUBAR, NO MAN'S LAND, VOL. 1: THE WAR OF THE WORDS (1990)

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SABRINA DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE (1985)

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SHAME AND PERFORMATIVITY: Henry James's New York Edition Prefaces (1995)

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TEACHING/DEPRESSION (2006)

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This is a wide-ranging exploration of teacher, student, activist, and psychotherapy identities, using Silvan Tomkins’ ideas on “depressiveness” and Melanie Klein’s concept of a “depressive position,” along with consideration of several scenes from Sedgwick’s book, A Dialogue on Love. She notes that “sometimes I feel like my students' analyst; other times, floundering all too visibly in my helplessness to evoke language from my seminar, I feel like a patient being held out on by 20 psychoanalysts at once.”

TEACHING EXPERIMENTAL CRITICAL WRITING (1998)

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'THE L WORD': Novelty in Normalcy (2004)

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THE VIBRANT POLITICS OF JOSEPHINE MILES (1982)

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TIDE AND TRUST (1989)

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WARHOL'S SHYNESS, WARHOL'S WHITENESS (1996)

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WRITING, GAY STUDIES, AND AFFECTION (1991)

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Unlike “White Glasses,” a memorial for Michael Lynch given while he was still living, this remembrance follows this death. Sedgwick describes Lynch’s qualities, his love of aesthetic, moral and political truth, flowers, what is bare and raw, and “the visionary fact of men having sex together - almost any men, almost anywhere.”